Nanotechnology powers new X-ray scanner

  At the University of North Carolina there has been a nanotechnology breakthrough in X-ray imaging. The breakthrough has come from carbon nanotubes being used to create a novel multi-beam source of X-rays. The carbon naotubes can be used as tiny electron guns, which dont have to heat up to create the X-rays. This means […]

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At the University of North Carolina there has been a nanotechnology breakthrough in X-ray imaging. The breakthrough has come from carbon nanotubes being used to create a novel multi-beam source of X-rays. The carbon naotubes can be used as tiny electron guns, which dont have to heat up to create the X-rays. This means the X-rays are created much faster than with standard techniques. This allows greater resolution by enabling faster image production.

The set-up even boasts being able to create a 3-D image of a tumour whilst simultaneously targeting the tumour cells with X-rays. As in normal radiotherapy.

This device means that there is no moving X-ray tube rather many different nanotubule emitters placed around the scanner, which are sequentially activated by passing a voltage through them. This is what gives the technique its unique capabilities.

The device will go into medical testing later this year. – CT

Source: MIT Technology Review

 

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