Oxidative Stress Induced by Iron Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cells

In a study conducted by researchers at Berkeley and the University of California it has been indicated that zero-valent iron nanoparticles can cause oxidative stress to lung cells. This means that the introduction of these iron nanoparticles is correlated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) seen in the cells. The presence of ROS […]

nanoparticles-iron-leslie-pelecky-2008-10

In a study conducted by researchers at Berkeley and the University of California it has been indicated that zero-valent iron nanoparticles can cause oxidative stress to lung cells. This means that the introduction of these iron nanoparticles is correlated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) seen in the cells. The presence of ROS increases the chances of cell damage and DNA mutation, which could increase likelihoods of cancer.

These nanoparticles are already commercially available but not yet in use. This study highlights how careful the scientific community have to be about new nanotechnologies. The same way new drugs must undergo rigorous pre-clinical and clinical trials these new nanotechnologies must be tested for their impact on the environment and ourselves.

Information about the effects of Nanotechnology on the environment can be found at SafeNano. – CT

Source: SafeNano

 

1 Response » to “Oxidative Stress Induced by Iron Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cells”

  1. A.Srinivas says:

    Dear Sir,
    Iam a research scholar working in a scientific research institute in Chennai, India. I am working on nanoparticle induced oxidative stress in both invivo and invitro models. It will be very helpful for me if you kindly sent the above article for my mail id. I will be very greatful to you sir for your kind cooperation.

    Thanking you,
    A.Srinivas,
    Chennai.



Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!